FILMS

logoFilms normally start at 7.30pm in The Guildhall of St George. Members and their guests can sign in from approx 7pm.

Forthcoming Film Dates for your Diary

Additional film dates
We are delighted to once again be working in partnership with the King’s Lynn Festival and have arranged these films as part of the Festival. Tickets for these films will be £4 for members and £5 for the public and will be available from the Corn Exchange. Details have been sent to you on how to purchase at the reduced rate.

2014
Thu 11th Sep – Calvary
Thu 9th Oct
Tue 21st Oct – All Is Lost
Fri 24th Oct
Thu 20th Nov
Thu 11th Dec – Joyeux Noël
2015
Thu 8th Jan
Sun 18th Jan
Thu 12th Feb
Tue 10th Mar – Mr Turner

2015 cont
Thu 12th Mar
Thu 9th Apr
Thu 14th May
Thu 11th Jun
Thu 9th Jul
Thu 13th Aug
Thu 10th Sept
Thu 8th Oct
Thu 22nd Oct
Thu 12th Nov
Thu 10th Dec


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Thursday 11th September 7.30pm

Calvary

(2014) 100 mins Cert 15A

Celebrate the Club’s fourth birthday with a complementary, pre-film glass of Cava and cake at Crofters from 6:30 onwards. Soft drinks will also be available.

CalvaryCALVARY’s Father James (Brendan Gleeson) is a good priest who is faced with sinister and troubling circumstances brought about by a mysterious member of his parish. Although he continues to comfort his own fragile daughter (Kelly Reilly) and reach out to help members of his church with their various scurrilous moral — and often comic — problems, he feels sinister and troubling forces closing in, and begins to wonder if he will have the courage to face his own personal Calvary.

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Tuesday 21st October 2.30pm

All Is Lost

(2013) 106 mins Cert 12A

Showing in partnership with the King’s Lynn Festival. Tickets are available from Corn Exchange Box Office at £4 instead of £5 for members and their guests on production of the codeword which has been circulated.

All Is LostDeep into a solo voyage in the Indian Ocean, an unnamed man (Redford) wakes to find his 39-foot yacht taking on water after a collision with a shipping container left floating on the high seas. With his navigation equipment and radio disabled, the man sails unknowingly into the path of a violent storm. Despite his success in patching the breached hull, his mariner’s intuition and a strength that belies his age, the man barely survives the tempest. Using only a sextant and nautical maps to chart his progress, he is forced to rely on ocean currents to carry him into a shipping lane in hopes of hailing a passing vessel. But with the sun unrelenting, sharks circling and his meagre supplies dwindling, the ever-resourceful sailor soon finds himself staring his mortality in the face.

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Thursday 11th December 7.30pm

Joyeux Noël (Merry Christmas)

(2006) 116 mins Cert 12A English, French and German with subtitles.

Joyeux NoelWhen war breaks out in the lull of summer 1914, it surprises and pulls millions of men in its wake. Christmas arrives, with its snow and multitude of family and army presents. But the surprise won’t come from inside the generous parcels which lie in the French, Scottish, and German trenches. That night, a momentous event will turn the destinies of four characters: an Anglican priest, a French lieutenant, an exceptional German tenor and the one he loves, a soprano and singing partner. During this Christmas Eve, the unthinkable happens: soldiers come out of their trenches, leaving their rifles behind to shake hands with the enemy.

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Tuesday 10th March 2.30pm

Mr Turner

(2014) 149 mins Cert 12A — Directed by Mike Leigh
in partnership with the King’s Lynn Festival

Mr TurnerTwice before, first with ‘Topsy-Turvy’ and then with ‘Vera Drake’, Mike Leigh has punctuated his bittersweet studies of contemporary life with period dramas. Now, with ‘Mr Turner’, the British director of ‘Naked’ and ‘Secrets and Lies’ takes us back to the nineteenth century and the later years of the celebrated, groundbreaking, difficult painter JMW Turner (1775-1851). Sad and joyful, ‘Mr Turner’ offers a wonderfully rich tapestry of experience and digs deeply into a complicated, contradictory life.

Timothy Spall — a veteran of Leigh’s films — plays this eccentric, determined London bohemian like a bronchial, cantankerous, randy old toad with backache. He grunts and grimaces and gropes his way through life. He talks like a market trader after a crash course in the classics. Leigh, meanwhile, explores Turner’s life unburdened by any sense of purpose other than an intense, contagious fascination with this man, his work, his times and, increasingly, the inevitable, slow, irresistible trudge towards death.

We observe Turner’s fondness for his elderly father; his sexual relationship with his meek housekeeper (Dorothy Atkinson); his rejection of his children and their mother; his arms-length acceptance by the lions of the Royal Academy; his late-life relationship with a Margate widow (Marion Bailey); and the mockery of the crowd when his work turns experimental. ‘Vile’ and a ‘yellow mess’ concludes Queen Victoria at an exhibition: the presence of royalty in a Mike Leigh film is just one of its many welcome surprises here. Mortality hangs heavily over ‘Mr Turner’, which covers roughly 25 years and is a poetic, brilliantly choreographed patchwork of moments and episodes. The film often has a wistful, regretful air, but alongside sadness sits great joy — there are moments of wicked humour.
Dave Calhoun

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