Logo1bFilms normally start at 7.30pm in The Guildhall of St George, King Street.   Members and their guests can sign in from approx 7pm.

Forthcoming Film Dates for your Diary

Additional film dates
Special Events
We are delighted to once again be working in partnership with the King’s Lynn Festival and have arranged these films as part of the Festival.   Tickets for these films will be £4 for members and £5 for the public and will be available from the Corn Exchange.   Details have been sent to you on how to purchase at the reduced rate.
Thursday 5th April — HOTEL SALVATION
  Thursday 26th April — My LIFE AS A COURGETTE
Thursday 10th May — THE PARTY
Thursday 14th June — ALL ABOUT EVE
Thursday 12th July — THE BIG SICK
Thursday 9th August — LUCKY
  Thursday 23rd August — THE WOMEN’S BALCONY


Thursday 5thApril 7.30pm


Comedy Drama — (2016) — 102 mins — Cert PG
Hindi : Subtitled — infrequent drug references

Director: Shubhashish Bhutiani
Cast includes Adil Hussain, Lalit Behl, Geetanjali Kulkarni, Palomi Ghosh, Navnindra Behl, Anil K. Rastogi

An ominous dream convinces 77-year-old Dayanand Kumar that his end could be near He takes the news to his son Rajiv, knowing he wants to breathe his last in the holy city of Varanasi and end the cycle of rebirth, by attaining salvation. Being the dutiful son he is, Rajiv, is left with no choice but to drop everything and make the journey with his stubborn father.Daya and Rajiv check into Mukti Bhawan(Hotel Salvation) in Varanasi, a guesthouse devoted to people to die there. But as the days go by, Rajiv struggles to juggle his responsibilities back home, while Daya starts to bloom in the hotel.Rajiv gives his father a shot at salvation but as family bonds are tested, he finds himself torn, not knowing what he must do to keep his life together.




Thursday 26thApril 7.30pm


Animation, Comedy, Drama — (2016) — 66 mins — Cert PG
mild sex references, references to traumatic childhood experiences

Director: Claude Barras
Cast includes Will Forte (voice), Nick Offerman (voice), Ellen Page (voice), Amy Sedaris (voice), Gaspard Schlatter (voice), Sixtine Murat (voice), Paulin Jaccoud (voice), Michel Vuillermoz (voice), Raul Ribera (voice), Estelle Hennard (voice)

After his mother’s sudden death, Courgette is befriended by a police officer, Raymond, who accompanies him to his new foster home, filled with other orphans his age. At first he struggles to find his place in this at times strange and hostile environment. But with Raymond’s help and his newfound friends, Courgette eventually learns to trust and love, as he searches for a new family of his own. Brought to life through striking character designs and expressive stop-motion animation, the story soars with laughter, sorrow, and joy, and stands as a testament to the resilience of the human heart. Beginning with its debut at Cannes, the film has stirred up an overwhelming response on the festival circuit, taking home top jury and audience prizes at Annecy, Melbourne and Angoulême.


About halfway through the credits, we see an animated sequence based, apparently, on the lead actor’s audition tape.




Thursday 10thMay 7.30pm


Drama Comedy — (2017) — 71 mins — Cert 15
Strong language, drug misuse

Director: Sally Potter
Cast includes Patricia Clarkson, Bruno Ganz, Cherry Jones, Emily Mortimer, Cillian Murphy, Kristin Scott Thomas, Timothy Spall

In Sally Potter’s new dark comedy THE PARTY, Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas) is hosting an intimate gathering of friends in her London home to celebrate her political ascension, while her husband, Bill (Timothy Spall), seems preoccupied. Janet’s acerbic best friend, April (Patricia Clarkson), arrives and others follow, some with their own dramatic news to share, but an announcement by Bill provokes a series of revelations that gradually unravel the sophisticated soiree, and a night that began with champagne may end with gunplay.


Filmed on a West London studio set in two weeks.

The Party was awarded the Guild Film Prize at the 67th Berlin International Film Festival.





Thursday 14thJune 7.30pm


Drama — (1950) — 133 mins — Cert U
Contains very mild sex references

Director: Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Cast includes Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, George Sanders, Celeste Holm, Gary Merrill, Hugh Marlowe, Gregory Ratoff, Barbara Bates, Marilyn Monroe, Thelma Ritter, Walter Hampden, Randy Stuart, Craig Hill, Leland Harris, Barbara White, Ed Fisher, William Pullen, Claude Stroud, Eugene Borden, Helen Mowery

Based on the story The Wisdom of Eve by Mary Orr, All About Eve is an elegantly bitchy backstage story revolving around aspiring actress Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter). Eve is waiting backstage to meet her idol, ageing Broadway star Margo Channing (Bette Davis). It seems innocent enough as Eve explains that she has seen Margo in EVERY performance of her current play. Only playwright/critic DeWitt (George Sanders) sees through Eve’s evil plan, which is to take her parts and her fiancé, Bill Simpson (Gary Merrill). When the fiancé shows no interest, she tries for playwright Lloyd Richards (Hugh Marlowe), but DeWitt stops her. After she accepts her award, she decides to skip the after-party and goes to her room, where a young woman named Phoebe has sneaked into her room and fallen asleep. This is where the “Circle of Life” now comes to fruition as Eve will get played like she played Margo.
All About Eve received 6 Academy Awards, including Best Picture.


Bette Davis fell in love with her co-star Gary Merrill during the shoot of this movie, and the two married in July 1950, a few weeks after filming was completed. They adopted a baby girl, whom they named Margot.

Zsa Zsa Gabor kept arriving on the set because she was jealous of her husband George Sanders in his scenes with the young blonde ingénue Marilyn Monroe.

Bette Davis’ marriage to William Grant Sherry was in the throes of breaking up while she was making the film. Her raspy voice in the film is largely due to the fact that she burst a blood vessel in her throat from screaming at her soon-to-be-ex-husband during one of their many rows. Director Joseph L. Mankiewicz liked the croaky quality so he didn’t have Davis try to work around it.

Bette Davis filmed all of her scenes in 16 days.

Margo Channing’s famous cocktail dress was an Edith Head creation. To Head’s horror, just as they were about to go film the cocktail party, she found that the dress didn’t quite fit Bette Davis in the shoulders. There was no time to fix the dress but fortunately Davis hit on the bright idea of simply slipping the dress off her shoulders.

The character played by Marilyn Monroe is called Miss Casswell; Caswell was the middle name of Mary Orr, the uncredited author of the short story the movie was based on.





Thursday 12thJuly 7.30pm


Romance comedy — (2017) — 117 mins — Cert 15
strong language, moderate sex references

strong language, moderate sex references
Cast includes Kumail Nanjiani, Zoe Kazan, Holly Hunter, Ray Romano, Adeel Akhtar, Anupam Kher, Zenobia Shroff, Bo Burnham

Kumail (Kumail Nanjiani), in the middle of becoming a budding stand-up comedian, meets Emily (Zoe Kazan). Meanwhile, a sudden illness sets in forcing Emily to be put into a medically-induced coma. Kumail must navigate being a comedian, dealing with tragic illness, and placating his family’s desire to let them fix him up with a spouse, while contemplating and figuring out who he really is and what he truly believes.


The screenplay for The Big Sick is written by Emily V. Gordon and her husband Kumail Nanjiani, and is loosely based on the real-life courtship between them before their marriage in 2007. According to Nanjiani, the idea to make a script about them was first inspired by the film’s eventual co-producer Judd Apatow when the two met while appearing in a 2012 episode of the You Made It Weird podcast. Developed over the course of three years, the script has been called semi-autobiographical because, in addition to the two lead characters modeled after them, many of the events occurring during Gordon and Nanjiani’s relationship are noted as being portrayed to an extent in the film. Though not part of the original script, a real-life incident involving Holly Hunter heckling an unnamed player during a US Open tennis match inspired a similar scene in the film where Nanjiani’s character is heckled during one of his stand-up sets.

The decision to add the real-life photos of Emily and Kumail in the credits was suggested by actress Leslie Mann after seeing an early cut of the film.

While writing the script, Kumail wanted his on-screen family to reflect the jokey and humorous traits of his real life family. He bemoaned that so many Muslim characters were so frequently depicted as overly serious and aimed to avoid that stereotype.

Emily V. Gordon: co-writer and the “real” Emily can be seen in the last scene of the film in the comedy club sitting near CJ and Mary.





Thursday 9thAugust 7.30pm


Drama — (2017) — 88 mins — Cert 18

Director: John Carroll Lynch
Cast includes Harry Dean Stanton, David Lynch, Ron Livingston

LUCKY follows the spiritual journey of a 90-year-old atheist and the quirky characters that inhabit his off the map desert town. Having out lived and out smoked all of his contemporaries, the fiercely independent Lucky finds himself at the precipice of life, thrust into a journey of self exploration, leading towards that which is so often unattainable: enlightenment. Acclaimed character actor John Carroll Lynch’s directorial debut “Lucky”, is at once a love letter to the life and career of Harry Dean Stanton as well as a meditation on morality, loneliness, spirituality, and human connection.


The film reunites Harry Dean Stanton and Tom Skerritt after 38 years since they appeared in Alien (1979).

Shot in eighteen days.

Director John Carroll Lynch and Beth Grant previously acted together in Jackie (2016).




Thursday 23rdAugust 7.30pm


Hebrew-subtitled — Comedy-Drama — (2017) — 96 mins

Director: Emil Ben-Shimon
Cast includes Evelin Hagoel, Igal Naor, Orna Banay, Einat Sarouf, Avraham Aviv Alush

The small Jewish community in “The Women’s Balcony” is a tight-knit one. When they talk, they don’t say “I,” they say “We.” They are not just a community, they are a “congregation,” with all that that implies to the faithful. A huge box office hit in Israel, the film was written by Shlomit Nehama, and directed by Emil Ben-Shimon. “The Women’s Balcony” is an eccentric portrait of an already devout community suddenly under pressure from a super Orthodox rabbi to observe their faith in a more rigid way. While the mood is that of a gentle and affectionate comedy, the film makes some extremely sharp points about fanaticism, sexism masked as holiness, and tolerance among the faithful.





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